Tag Archive: dismissal

Notices of termination may not be signed before mass dismissal notification has been submitted

With its judgment dated 21 August 2018, the Higher Regional Labour Court of Baden-Wurttemberg (Landesarbeitsgericht Baden-Württemberg) decided that the dismissal of an employee as part of a mass redundancy is invalid if the notice of termination is signed prior to receipt of the mass dismissal notification to the authority. The time of the receipt of …

Continue reading »

Dismissal on suspicion (“Verdachtskündigung”) – reasonable time period to give a statement regarding the accusations

On 21 March 2018, the state labor court of Schleswig-Holstein ruled that a valid “dismissal on suspicion” (“Verdachtskündigung”) requires that the affected employee had been granted a reasonable time period to give a statement regarding the accusations (docket number 3 Sa 398/17). A “dismissal on suspicion” is void if the employer issues the notice of …

Continue reading »

Threat to commit suicide or to run amok can justify a dismissal for cause with immediate effect

On 29 June 2017 the Federal Labour Court decided that a serious threat of committing suicide or to run amok can be a compelling reason to terminate an employment relationship for cause with immediate effect if the employee thereby seeks to exert pressure on the employer (docket number 2 AZR 47/16). The employee and later …

Continue reading »

Inadmissible evidence through installation of a keylogger

Using a software keylogger may not always be much help in supporting a termination for cause, as a recent case before the Federal Labour Court shows (judgment dated 27 July 2017, docket number 2 AZR 681/16). The employee had worked for the employer since 2011. When opening up its network, the company informed employees that …

Continue reading »

Competing activities during notice period can justify an immediate termination for cause

In its judgment dated 12 April 2017 (docket number 3 Sa 202/16), the Higher Regional Labour Court of Schleswig Holstein found that activities for a competitor during an employee’s notice period may justify an immediate termination for cause. Under the employment contract, the employee had committed not to hold any shares of a company in …

Continue reading »

Special case of termination protection: Third parties’ pressure to terminate an employee

The German right of termination is known to be quite strict. A reason for termination is always necessary. It is herefore surprising that such a reason exists even if third parties exert pressure on the employer to terminate the contract (“Druckkündigung”). The basics are presented below. By judgment of 15.12.2016 ( docket number 2 AZR …

Continue reading »

Ineffective termination in spite of frequent short term absences due to illness

On 7 March 2017, the Higher Labour Court (LAG Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, docket number 2 Sa 158/16) decided that a termination can be ineffective even though the employee’s absences due to illnesses are frequent and significant. The illness must fulfill the requirements of the negative prognosis that the employee will not come back to work for …

Continue reading »

Leaving the workplace to take care of a sick dog can lead to termination

The Higher Labour Court Nuremberg (Landesarbeitsgericht Nürnberg, docket number 5 Sa 59/17) ruled on 21 July 2016, that leaving the workplace to take care of a sick dog can lead to termination. The Higher Labour Court confirmed the respective decision of the Labour Court Nürnberg (Arbeitsgericht). The defendant as an employer operates a pipe cleaning …

Continue reading »

Shortened notice period during probationary period requires clear language

German law allows a short notice period of two weeks during a probationary period, which can be agreed for up to six months. However, if the employment contract generally provides for a longer notice period, without making clear that this longer notice period only applies after the end of the probationary period, that longer notice …

Continue reading »

Employer May Ban Employees From Wearing Headscarves

In a recent ruling made on March 14, 2017, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) decided (docket nos. C-157/15, C-188/15) that employers may prohibit staff from wearing Islamic headscarves under certain circumstances. The ECJ held that such prohibitions do not constitute “direct discrimination”; instead, limits on visible religious wear shall be considered permitted under EU …

Continue reading »

Older posts «