Category Archive: Works Council

Works council’s request to dismiss an employee qualifies as an urgent operational reason for dismissal

Under German law, the works council can request that an employer dismisses or reassigns an employee if the employee has violated the law or has grossly violated principles set forth in sec. 75 of the Works Constitution Act, such as by showing racist or xenophobic behavior in the workplace. If the employer does not comply …

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The Works Council’s right of co-determination regarding the Employer’s Facebook presence

The German Federal Labour Court (Bundesarbeitsgericht) decided on 13 December 2016 that the Works Council has a right of co-determination when the employer’s Facebook page allows other users to post comments, which are related to the behaviour and performance of the employees. The employer operates a blood donor service. The doctors working at the blood …

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No laptop for works council

It depends on the specific circumstances of the individual case whether a works council with eleven members, which is already provided with two personal computers, can claim to be provided with an additional laptop. The defendant runs a freight company with 350 employees. Its works council, which has eleven members, already works with two internet-enabled …

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Federal Labor Court rulings to watch in 2017 (edition Jan – March)

Already in the first quarter of the New Year Germany’s Federal Labor Court will deliver a number of judgments important for advisors and practitioners alike: Time Credits for works council members? (- docket no 7 AZR 224/15 – expected for 18 January 2017- ) Although members of a works council act in an honorary role …

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Co-determination of the works council concerning Facebook presence of the employer

The Federal Labor Court (Bundesarbeitsgericht, BAG) decided on 13 December 2016 (docket number: 1 ABR 7/15) that the works council has a right of co-determination if an employer launches a Facebook page and allows Facebook users to publish posts on his Facebook page which refer to the behavior or performance of individual employees. The employer …

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Saturday-Sunday-LLC

The Higher Labour Court of Hamm (Landesarbeitsgericht Hamm, docket number 13 TaBVGa 8/16) decided on 24 October 2016 that the works council cannot prevent the employer from flying in weekend shifts from its Portuguese operation without the approval of the works council. In this case – currently only available as a press release – the …

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No right of the works council to remove a managing director

The works council has no right to have the company´s managing director removed, the Higher Labour Court Hamm (Landesarbeitsgericht Hamm, docket number 7 TaBV 11/16) ruled on 2 August 2016.   The works council had claimed to remove the managing director of the employer pursuant to sec. 104 of the Works Constitution Act (Betriebsverfassungsgesetz, BetrVG). …

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Full-time works council members must notify employer about absences

The Federal Labour Court (Bundesarbeitsgericht, BAG) ruled on 24 February 2016 (docket number 7 ABR 20/14) that employees who are released completely from work due to works council duties (Freistellung) have to notify the employer when they fulfil their duties outside of the company and report back upon return. In the case at hand, two …

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Terminations for breaches of compliance regulations

On 26 February 2016 (docket number: 1 Sa 358/15) the Higher Labour Court (Landesarbeitsgericht, LAG) Rhineland-Palatinate decided that an employer may terminate the employment relationship with an employee who breached company compliance rules provided the employee was served with a warning for a similar violation before. In the present case the court found that the …

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Dissolution of the works council only in case of a collective breach of duties

On 4 February 2016 (docket number: 10 TaBV 2078/15) the Higher Labour Court Berlin-Brandenburg (Landesarbeitsgericht, LAG) ruled that where only individual works council members breach their legal duties, the works council will not be dissolved as a whole. In the case at hand, the parties were in dispute over the dissolution of the works council …

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